Tag Archives: anxiety

HAPPIFUL MAGAZINE MAY 2022

WELLBEING WINS | SPOT ANXIETY | WILL YOUNG | ACID REFLUX​
10 quick workplace wellbeing wins
Let’s be honest, it’s easy for workplace wellbeing to fall off the agenda every now and then. There’s always something getting in the way, whether it’s battling your inbox, dealing with difficult customers, or trying to meet a deadline. But when we prioritise wellness, those other tasks don’t feel quite as stressful.    Not sure where to start? Here are 10 quick wins you can implement right now…
Five symptoms of anxiety no one talks about
Anxiety can show itself in many different and subtle ways, often sneaking up on us before we’ve really realised what’s happening. So, understanding the symptoms of anxiety to watch out for can help you to address the root cause sooner. Here, we are sharing five warning signs that people often aren’t aware of.  
Happiful’s podcast returns with Will Young
Our podcast ‘I am. I have’ is back, and have we got some great conversations for you! We kicked off series eight with Will Young, who shared his own experiences and the motivation for writing his new book Be Yourself and Happier: The A-Z of Wellbeing. The podcast also features the gentle snoring of his beautiful rescue dog Domino…   You’ll find ‘I am. I have’ on all podcast platforms as well as Happiful’s YouTube channel
How to beat acid reflux
Ever found yourself struck with a burning sensation in the throat or chest? Or have issues with burping and indigestion that make you feel as if you’ve got a lump in your throat? These are all common acid reflux symptoms, which, while not usually serious, can be extremely uncomfortable and impact your mental health. Here, we’re sharing tips for beating acid reflux with dietary changes
Keep it rolling
Sign up for a rolling subscription for just £5.99 per month​, and get the latest Happiful magazine delivered straight to your door. Automatically renewing for each new issue – with the option to pause at any time – it’s the fresh, convenient way to enjoy Happiful. Also, you never worry about extra charges, as you can enjoy free postage to UK and NI addresses. Happy reading!  

Once you’ve finished your magazine, join our friendly, supportive Facebook group, where you can connect with other readers and wellbeing professionals to chat about all things mental health. 
GET YOUR COPY

Anxiety – Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) guide

They have a very easy to understand & helpful guide to anxiety here

It is tough times at the moment and anxiety & worry will be high given the current events in Ukraine, along with the pandemic, rising living costs…crikey making myself even more anxious now! Seriously though there is help out there, you must never feel you are alone as someone, somewhere will listen. I am lucky to have a supporting family, but even with that it so easy to overthink things and become anxious, which can lead to physical symptoms too.

Do try to limit your news intake each day and set aside some time for your worries at a set time of the day. Worry time as the Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) bods calls it. This blog has a good guide on it.

I may mention music a bit 🙂 but it does help me at work to concentrate and block out outside chatter about world events, which can make you feel worse and lets face it, unless you are a specialist in any area your work colleagues & friends are merely expressing opinions or social media ‘truths’.

Stay safe out there and don’t feel bad in asking for help or telling someone how you feel.

Mental Health Awareness week May 10-16 2021

From the Mental Health Foundation (UK) website –

During long months of the pandemic, millions of us turned to nature. Our research on the mental health impacts of the pandemic showed going for walks outside was one of our top coping strategies and 45% of us reported being in green spaces had been vital for our mental health. Websites which showed footage from webcams of wildlife saw hits increase by over 2000%. Wider studies also found that during lockdowns, people not only spent more time in nature but were noticing it more.

It was as if we were re-discovering at our most fragile point our fundamental human need to connect with nature.

Nature and our mental health

Nature is so central to our psychological and emotional health, that it’s almost impossible to realise good mental health for all without a greater connection to the natural world. For most of human history, we lived as part of nature. It is only in the last five generations that so many of us have lived and worked in a context that is largely separated from nature. And it is only since a 1960s study in the US found that patients who were treated in hospitals with a view of nature recovered faster, that science has started to unpack the extraordinary health benefits.

During Mental Health Awareness Week 2021, we will pull together the evidence that demonstrates the powerful benefits of nature for our mental health. We will look at nature’s unique ability to not only bring consolation in times of stress, but also increase our creativity, empathy and a sense of wonder. It turns out that it is not just being in nature but how we open ourselves up and interact with nature that counts. We will show that even small contacts with nature can reduce feelings of social isolation and be effective in protecting our mental health, and preventing distress.

Nature is our great untapped resource for a mentally healthy future.

Despite this, many of us are not accessing or benefitting from nature. Teenagers in particular appear to be less connected with nature and around 13% of UK households have no access to a garden. We want to challenge the disparities in who is and who isn’t able to experience nature. Nature is not a luxury. It is a resource that must be available for everyone to enjoy – as basic as having access to clean water or a safe roof over our heads. Local and national governments need to consider their role in making this a reality for everyone, and we will be talking about how they can do so during the week.

What are the goals for the week?

We have two clear aims. Firstly, to inspire more people to connect with nature in new ways, noticing the impact that this connection can have for their mental health. Secondly, to convince decision makers at all levels that access to and quality of nature is a mental health and social justice issue as well as an environmental one.

2021 is going be a huge year for nature: a new Environment Bill will go through the UK Parliament which will shape the natural world for generations to come; the UK will host the G7 nations where creating a greener future will be a key priority and a historic international UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) will be hosted in Glasgow in November.

There could not be a more important time to understand the links between nature and mental health.

What you can do

Stories are the best tools we have to influence change. Unless we can demonstrate nature’s role in bringing solace and joy to our lives, it will remain under-valued and under-utilised.

We want to hear your stories of how nature has supported your mental health. This might be as a simple as tending to a house plant, listening to the birds, touching the bark of trees, smelling flowers or writing a poem about our favourite nature spot.

Whatever it is for you, we invite you to #ConnectWithNature and share what this means for you.

During Mental Health Awareness Week, we are asking you to do three things: 

  • Experience nature: take time to recognise and grow your connection with nature during the week. Take a moment to notice and celebrate nature in your daily life. You might be surprised by what you notice!
  • Share nature: Take a photo, video or sound recording and share the connections you’ve made during the week, to inspire others. Join the discussion on how you’re connecting with nature by using the hashtags #ConnectWithNature #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek
  • Talk about nature: use our tips, school packs, research and policy guides to discuss in your family, school, workplace and community how you can help encourage people to find new ways to connect with nature in your local environment.

For more information about this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week visit mentalhealth.org.uk/mhaw or join the conversation on social media using #ConnectWithNature and #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek 

My experiences…

I have given much thought about whether to post publically about my anxiety, not something a fiftysomething is overly keen to chat about! This graphic below is one of the best examples of showing what anxiety looks and feels like. You don’t necessarily have all of these feelings and emotions, as everyone gets anxious at times. The difference for me and many others is that we can’t stop thinking about scenarios in our heads, worrying about what people will think and say about what we will say and do.

‘Second guessing’ is one of my personal habits that is annoying to me, yet I find it very difficult not to. I am more than often trying to say or do what the person I am interacting with hopes I will say or do. It gets very tiring mentally and you never really switch off. However, four things have helped me greatly…my loving wife & family who understand my anxiety; music as it helps distract and focus my mind away from running through endless scenarios and worries; Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) techniques to help when I for example feel a panic attack coming on; and finally nature and the great outdoors.

The latter I enjoy simply by walks, observing the changing wildlife and flora or just by pottering about in the garden. Even in a city you can seek out nature, be it by a walk around a nearby park, looking out for bird life and wildlife near to you, looking at any trees local to you – tree hugging optional 😉 You can reach out to people and the biggest step is asking for some help or even recognising you need to tackle your mental health.

One of the last great taboos in our society is mental health and it doesn’t have to be. Join in this year’s Mental Health Awareness week and find out more here